1st Week of Advent

11-28-2021Weekly ReflectionFr. John C. Granato

My Dear Friends,

We have made it through another liturgical year. Today is the first Sunday of Advent. In four more weeks we will celebrate the great feast of Christmas. We have just finished the series on the Mass, so now would be a great primer in the lectionary. If I repeat myself, I am sorry, but St. Ignatius of Loyola once said that repetition is the mother of all learning.

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End of Mass Prayers

11-21-2021Weekly ReflectionFr. John C. Granato

My Dear Friends,

We are coming upon the end of the Mass in these writings. The great Eucharistic Prayer has just been prayed and now we come to the Our Father. In the older form of Mass, the people would respond with only the last line of the Our Father, “But deliver us from evil.” The reformed liturgy has the priest and people praying the Our Father together. After the Our Father, the priest prays, “Deliver us, Lord, we pray, from every evil, graciously grant peace in our days, that, by the help of your mercy, we may be always free from sin and safe from all distress, as we await the blessed hope and the coming of our Savior, Jesus Christ.”

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Features of the Roman Canon

11-14-2021Weekly ReflectionFr. John Granato

My Dear Friends,

Continuing with the Eucharistic prayers, I want to discuss some features of the Roman Canon. The reason the Eucharistic prayer was prayed silently for centuries is that it is an act of sacrifice. The priest has entered into the Holy of Holies at this moment to pray and offer the sacrifice in the name of the whole Church. It is for this reason also that the priest would for centuries pray the Eucharistic Prayer facing in the same direction as the people; symbolically it is the priest who is leading all of us into worship of God and into the offering of the sacrifice.

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The Preface & Eucharistic Prayer

11-07-2021Weekly ReflectionFr. John C. Granato

My Dear Friends,

After the excitement of the last few weeks, we will return to the Mass. We last left the offertory. Following the offertory we have the preface dialogue and preface to the Eucharistic prayer. The preface dialogue is an ancient dialogue of priest and people where the priest greets the people with the words, “The Lord be with you,” and you respond with, “And with your spirit.” The next line is, “Lift up your hearts,” and you respond, “We lift them up to the Lord.” And finally the priest says, “Let us give thanks to the Lord our God,” and you respond, “It is right and just.” After this dialogue the priest will pray the preface.

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